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Tasmanian Oak

/ Tasmanian Oak

One of Australia’s most popular hardwoods, improved

  • / Easy to work, cut, stain & build
  • / Straight lined edge
  • / Stains well
  • / Internally scanned for defects

Tasmanian Oak is a light-coloured hardwood that is easy to work with and produces a beautiful warm finish. Grown in Tasmania, Tasmanian Oak  consists of the same species as Victorian ash – with the addition of Messmate. Tasmanian Oak has slightly more tonal depth and is renowned for its excellent staining qualities, making it easy to match with existing finishes.

What makes our Tasmanian Oak truly unique is how production improves its use and performance. Once our slabs are quarter sawn to ensure optimal stability, our timber is cut perfectly straight to give you a superior Tasmanian Oak.

As a strong and stable hardwood, Tasmanian Oak offers great workability due to its high sanding and gluing potential. Suitable for a range of uses, Tasmanian Oak is the perfect timber for interior applications like furniture and joinery, staircase components, DAR & sawn, flooring and lining.

Benefits of Tasmanian Oak Timber

Straightened edge
No Internal Checking
Stains well
Stored carbon
Low embodied energy
Sustainable resource
Machines well
Can sand and re-polish
Quarter Sawn for Stability

Tasmanian Oak Characteristics

Colour Blonde to straw to light brown
Grain Straight open and even grained with a uniform texture
Moisture Content Medium density 660 KG/m3 at 12% moisture content. Seasoned to comply with the Australian Standard AS2796 (9% – 14%) with the average moisture content ranging between 10% and 12%.
Impact Resistance High – 18 joules
Janka 4.9 kN (seasoned)
Unit Shrinkage (KD) Measurable movement in service – Low
Radial: 0.22% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change.
Tangential: 0.35% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change
Stability High (quarter sawn)
Cutting Very Good
Bending Satisfactory
Glueing Very Good
Lyctus Susceptible Susceptible
Nail holding Very Good
Durability Above ground – Class 3
Below ground – Class 4
Fire Refer Australian Standard AS1530 Part 3 and Building Code of Australia
Ignitability index: 14
Spread of flame index: 8
Heat Evolved index: 7
Smoke development index: 3
Flooring AS/ISO 9239.1
Critical Radiant Heat Flux: More than 2.2kW/m2 and less than 4.5kW/m2
Smoke development Rate: Less than 750% -min
Wall and Ceiling lining AS/NZS3837: 1998
Average extinction area: less than 250m2/kg
Material Group No: 3 (unless coated to meet Group 1 & 2)
Bushfire Attack level: BAL 19 High (BAL-29 and BAL-40 in proprietary systems)
Colour Blonde to straw to light brown
Grain Straight, open and even. Occasionally course grained or fiddle backed. Growth rings are visual and usually conspicuous
Moisture Content Medium density 680 KG/m3 at 12% moisture content. Seasoned to comply with the Australian Standard AS2796 (9% – 14%) with the average moisture content ranging between 10% and 12%.
Impact Resistance High – 18-20 Joules
Janka 5.7 kN (seasoned)
Unit Shrinkage (KD) Measurable movement in service – Low
Radial: 0.23% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change.
Tangential: 0.36% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change
Stability High (quarter sawn)
Cutting Very Good
Bending Satisfactory
Glueing Very Good
Lyctus Susceptible Susceptible
Nail holding Very Good
Durability Above ground – Class 3
Below ground – Class 4
Fire Refer Australian Standard AS1530 Part 3 and Building Code of Australia
Ignitability index: 14
Spread of flame index: 8
Heat Evolved index: 7
Smoke development index: 3
Flooring AS/ISO 9239.1
Critical Radiant Heat Flux: More than 2.2kW/m2 and less than 4.5kW/m2
Smoke development Rate: Less than 750% -min
Wall and Ceiling lining AS/NZS3837: 1998
Average extinction area: less than 250m2/kgMaterial Group No: 3 (unless coated to meet Group 1 & 2)
Bushfire Attack level: BAL 19 High (BAL-29 and BAL-40 in proprietary systems)
Colour Blonde to pale brown
Grain Strong linear grain with a uniform texture
Moisture Content Medium density 770 KG/m3
Impact Resistance 16 Joules
Janka 7.1 kN (seasoned)
Unit Shrinkage (KD) Measurable movement in service – Medium to High
Radial: 0.23% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change.
Tangential: 0.36% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change
Stability High (quarter sawn)
Cutting Very Good
Bending Satisfactory
Glueing Very Good
Lyctus Susceptible Susceptible
Nail holding Very Good
Durability Above ground – Class 3
Below ground – Class 3
Fire Refer Australian Standard AS1530 Part 3 and Building Code of Australia
Ignitability index: 13
Spread of flame index: 5
Smoke development index: 3
Critical Radiant Heat Flux: More than 2.2kW/m2 and less than 4.5kW/m2
Smoke development Rate: Less than 750% -min
Average extinction area: more than 250m2/kg
Material Group No: 3 (unless coated to meet Group 1 & 2)
Bushfire Attack level: BAL 12.5 and 19

Calculate Carbon Sequestration

Calculate the carbon sequestration of your project and the time it takes to regrow the timber.

0.0 kg
Total carbon captured
0.0 min
Growth rate
The figures for CO2 captured and growth rate used in this calculator were sourced from Wood Solutions, VicForests and AHEC.

Frequently asked
questions

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What is the difference between Victorian ash and Tasmanian Oak?

Victorian ash and Tasmanian Oak have a number of similarities as both varieties are known to be durable, versatile and easy to work with. Victorian ash refers to a hardwood sourced from Victoria and made up of two species of timber – Eucalyptus Regnans and Eucalyptus Delegatensis. Tasmanian Oak includes these two species with the addition of Eucalyptus Obliqua (Messmate) and is sourced from Tasmania. Both varieties are considered light coloured hardwoods, however Victorian ash tends to have a lighter and more consistent finish, while Tasmanian Oak is found to have additional pink and brown tones.

What colour is Tasmanian Oak?

Tasmanian Oak is a light-coloured hardwood that can vary from a straw blonde to a light brown finish with shades of pink and cream throughout. Tasmanian Oak can often have large variations in colour as the timber tends to darken as the tree grows.

Is Tasmanian Oak easy to work with?

Tasmanian Oak is a great timber to work with, it is easy to cut, sand, plane and glue. Even better, the light colour allows it to be stained any colour.

What is Tasmanian Oak used for?

Tasmanian Oak is a versatile hardwood making it suitable for a range of uses such as construction and interior applications, this includes  furniture and joinery, staircase components, DAR & sawn, flooring and lining.

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